top of page
The Eye-Pain Trial: Using EEG Neurofeedback to gain control over brain activity in a way that reduces chronic eye pain

This research study aims to determine if a form of
biofeedback known as EEG neurofeedback can help
reduce neuropathic eye pain.


Evidence from previous studies suggests that the
development of chronic neuropathic pain is associated with abnormal electrical brain activity. Neurofeedback has been used to reduce pain by aiming to regulate these abnormal EEG frequencies thought to be responsible for the ongoing experience of pain.


By interacting with a computer game while wearing an EEG headset to measure and record your brain activity, we will trial whether people with chronic eye pain can learn to gain control over their brain activity in a way that reduces their pain.


If you participate, you will be required to complete 20
sessions of 5 x 2.5-minutes of EEG neurofeedback at
home over a period of 4 weeks.


You will also be required to complete online
questionnaires at 4 different timepoints; and answer
questions related to the intensity and interference of your eye pain every day for the duration of the study.

 

Each participant will be provided with an EEG
neurofeedback system to self-administer at home.


To register your interest, please complete and submit the form. The research team will contact you as soon as possible.

Register your interest

Have you been diagnosed with neuropathic eye pain?
Has your eye pain persisted for longer than 6 months?
Do you consent for us to keep your details in our secure, password protected database and we will contact you to see if you are interested in other trials we conduct? Your details will only be accessible by researchers from the NeuroRecovery Research Hub and will not be shared with anyone else.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact our research team: neurorecoveryresearch@unsw.edu.au

Lara with EEG.jpeg
bottom of page